Bob Kehoe, 89

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Research is the key in The Game Of All Games (http://www.stiffs.com), and information is precious. Therefore, DO NOT blurt out anything you may have heard about a celebrity's health, or even the fact that a famous person is really old, UNLESS that info has appeared on stiffs.com's SickTicker, OR, you have seen or heard it yourself on CNN, ABC, CBS, MSNBC, Fox, AND the Drudge Report. When in doubt, shut the fuck up.

Please also refrain from making public the names of any write-in candidates that have not yet been approved by the Fame Committee. If you don't know what the Fame Committee is, see this immediately: www.stiffs.com/blog/kpr

Be aware, too, that this forum is NOT the place to promote your own shitty dead pool.

One more rule: have fun.

Bob Kehoe, 89

Postby ScottLevison » Thu Sep 07, 2017 7:19 am

http://www.stltoday.com/sports/soccer/s ... cb9c0.html

St. Louis soccer legend Bob Kehoe dies at 89

By Joe Lyons St. Louis Post-Dispatch
Joe Lyons
Sep 6, 2017

Robert “Bob” Kehoe, the only man to captain and coach the U.S. men’s national soccer team, died late Monday afternoon (Sept. 4, 2017) in hospice care. He was 89.

“Just an incredible man,” said longtime friend and fellow local soccer standout Pat McBride. “I played with, against and for Bob during my career. He was an incredible storyteller and just a humble, approachable man. As a player, I’ve heard people kid that your team was down 1-0 as soon as Bob stepped on the field against you.”

Jim Leeker, president of the St. Louis Soccer Hall of Fame, added: “Bob was a true gentleman.”

A St. Louis native, Mr. Kehoe played on St. Louis University High’s first soccer team in 1943 and graduated in 1947. A gifted athlete, he signed a professional baseball contract after high school and spent six years as a minor-leaguer with the Phillies, Dodgers and Cardinals.

He returned home and starred with a number of local soccer clubs, including the powerful Kutis side that dominated in the U.S. Amateur Cup and won the U.S. Open Cup title in 1957.

Mr. Kehoe worked a variety of jobs, including stints as a St. Louis policeman and as a St. Louis firefighter.

“Back then, policemen and firemen also worked side jobs,” said Jane, his wife of 45 years. “One night, we had him list all his jobs and it came to more than 50.”

McBride added: “He never got fired, but he’d get tired or bored and just move on to something new.”

A defender, Mr. Kehoe earned four caps as captain of the U.S. squad during World Cup qualifying in 1965. In 1967, he joined the St. Louis Stars soccer club in the public relations department, serving as color commentator on the team’s broadcasts. The next season, he even played in one game.

“He showed up for the game expecting to do the broadcast and ended up on the field because they needed players,” Leeker said, chuckling.

Mr. Kehoe was promoted by the Stars, becoming the first American-born coach in the North American Soccer League in 1969. He relied heavily on St. Louis-area talent over the next two seasons and was the first coach in NASL history to play a game with American-only players.

In 1972, Mr. Kehoe coached the U.S. in World Cup qualifying.

With some coaxing from his second wife, Kehoe started college at age 42 and graduated with a degree from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville in just three years.

“We’d met when he was 40 or 41 and I asked him what he was planning to do with the rest of his life,” Jane recalled. “When he said he thought he might want to try teaching and coaching, I told him I knew just the place.

“At one point, he was told he’d have to take a math course — Bob really hated math — and ended up taking French. It was the craziest thing; he’d be walking around the house speaking French. He was so funny.”

Mr. Kehoe would spend the next 10 years teaching and coaching soccer at Granite City North High. He also worked as director of coaching for the Busch Soccer Club and as a commentator for the St. Louis Steamers.

“Somehow, Bob’s life always seemed to come back to soccer,” Jane said.

Mr. Kehoe was voted into the St. Louis Soccer Hall of Fame in 1983 and into the National Soccer Hall of Fame in 1989. He was named to the Illinois High School Soccer Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 1989 and inducted into the St. Louis Amateur Baseball Hall of Fame in 1999.

“He’ll be missed,” McBride said. “But Bob jammed an awful lot of life into his 89 years.”

Instead of a memorial service, there will be a celebration of his life at the Soccer Park in Fenton in the next month or so.

“The last thing Bob would’ve wanted was to have everybody grieving over him,” said Jane, noting that Mr. Kehoe has four adult children from his first marriage. “That last few weeks were tough, but Bob had come to peace with things and I almost consider the end to be a blessing at this point. We’ll give it a little time for everyone to do their grieving and then we’ll come together so that his family and friends can share stories and remember all the good times they had with Bob.”
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